Failing world

pollution

The fight for freedom has become more important these days but at what cost we destroy the world for small conveniences so as to live a false attachment to living. A pollutant is a loss material that pollutes air, water or soil. Three factors define the severity of a pollutant: its chemical environment, the concentration, and the persistence. Pollution has cost. Industrial activities that cause air pollution tax health and clean-up costs on the whole society, whereas the neighbors of a person who chooses to fire-proof his home, may benefit from a decreased risk of a fire growing in their own houses. If external costs exist, such as contamination, the producer may choose to produce more of the product than would be generated if the manufacturer were ordered to pay all connected environmental costs. Because responsibility or importance for self-directed action lies partly outside the self, an element of externalization is required. If there are outer benefits, such as in common safety, less of the good may be provided than would be the case if the generator were to receive debt for the obvious benefits to others. Some of the more natural soil contaminants are chlorinated hydrocarbons (CFH), heavy minerals (such as chromium, cadmium–found in rechargeable batteries, and lead–found in lead paint, flying fuel and still in some countries, gasoline), MTBE, zinc, arsenic and benzene. In 2001 a series of press reports ending in a book called Fateful Harvest unveiled a public practice of recycling manufacturing byproducts into fertilizer, producing in the pollution of the soil with various metals. Ordinary community landfills are the source of many chemical essences entering the soil environment (and often groundwater), arising from the wide variety of refuse accepted, particularly substances illegally discarded there, or from pre-1970 landfills that may have been subjected to the little direction in the U.S. or EU. There have also been some surprising releases of polychlorinated dibenzodioxins, commonly called dioxins for simplicity, such as TCDD.